Fix Amifldrv64.sys BSOD when Updating BIOS



RECOMMENDED: Click here to fix Windows errors and optimize system performance

Some Windows users experience a BSOD (Blue Screen of Death) pointing to the amifldrv64.sys file when they try to update their BIOS version (at the very beginning of the flash process). There are several error codes associated with this problem, but the most common is the 0xc1 error.

If you try to update your BIOS directly from your operating system, keep in mind that this is not the best approach and that this procedure alone could result in different BSODs due to two third-party driver conflicts. If possible, try to update your BIOS version from a USB stick.

The Blue Screen of Death (BSoD) is a Microsoft Windows operating system error screen that appears to indicate system conflicts and the risk of crashing. It got its name because these critical messages were displayed on a blue screen.

What is amifldrv64.sys?

The amifldrv64.sys file is 13864 bytes (13KB) in size. The download links in this file are clean and no users have given negative comments. It has been downloaded 10 times since it has been available for download. amifldrv64.sys is a sys file created by MSI for strangers. The latest version we have details of is: unknown, size: 13864 bytes (13KB), path: C:\Windows\system32\unknown



April 2020 Update:

We now recommend using this tool for your error. Additionally, this tool fixes common computer errors, protects you against file loss, malware, hardware failures and optimizes your PC for maximum performance. You can fix your PC problems quickly and prevent others from happening with this software:

  • Step 1 : Download PC Repair & Optimizer Tool (Windows 10, 8, 7, XP, Vista – Microsoft Gold Certified).
  • Step 2 : Click “Start Scan” to find Windows registry issues that could be causing PC problems.
  • Step 3 : Click “Repair All” to fix all issues.

download



Disable Driver Verifier

Driver Verifier is a built-in diagnostic tool available for Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10. Its main purpose is to verify both Microsoft native and third-party drivers. It works by putting a lot of pressure on drivers to fail incompatible or outdated drivers.

While this feature is good for maintaining a healthy driver selection, it tends to conflict with BIOS flash utilities. Keep in mind that BIOS flash utilities tend to be little more than simple scripts that are not often updated by motherboard manufacturers.

For this reason, the vast majority of BSODs displayed during a BIOS update procedure are actually caused by the driver checker, especially when it points to the Amifldrv64.sys file.

Using System Restore

system restore1

If your system has recently started blue filtering, use the System Restore feature to return the system software to a previous state. If this works, you know it is probably a software problem.

A computer in good working order should not have a blue screen at all, but no software or hardware is perfect. Even a properly functioning computer can rarely have a blue screen for no apparent reason – perhaps due to rare driver errors or hardware problems. If your computer regularly displays a blue screen, you have a problem. If you get a blue screen every two years, don’t worry.

Only boot your PC with the necessary hardware.

A useful step in resolving many situations, including BSOD problems, is to boot your computer with the minimum amount of hardware required to run the operating system. If your computer boots successfully, it proves that one of the remote hardware devices is causing the STOP message.

https://www.dell.com/community/Inspiron-Desktops/Inspiron-3650-BIOS-update-amifldrv64-sys/td-p/6090239



RECOMMENDED: Click here to troubleshoot Windows errors and optimize system performance