Group Policy Settings Reference Guide for Windows 10/8.1/7/Server



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The Group Policy IT Pro, beginners and setup enthusiasts rely on adjusting and applying settings on their computers. The Group Policy Editor (Gpedit.msc) is one of the most useful tools for managing policies in Windows.

However, the Group Policy Editor is not included in all editions of Windows. For example, in Windows 8, group policy is only included in Windows 8 Pro and Enterprise Editions. While Windows 7 Ultimate, Professional and Enterprise editions have it, Windows 7 Home Premium, Home Basic and Starter editions do not include the Group Policy Editor.

Group Policy Settings Reference Manual



May 2019 Update:

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Microsoft has updated and provided the Group Policy Settings Reference Guide for Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012 R2 for download. The download is available in spreadsheet format for different operating systems. You can only download the table for operating systems that may be of interest to you.

The Group Policy Editor provides filtering options. These spreadsheets also provide filtering functions that allow you to view a subset of data based on a value or combination of values available in one or more columns.

These tables list the policy settings for the computer and user configurations contained in the management template files provided with the specified Windows operating systems. You can configure these policy parameters when changing group policy objects.

What is also very useful in these tables is that it also lists the registry keys that are affected when parameters are changed. Of course, you can always use the Group Policy Settings search to find out which registry key and value name supports a particular policy setting.

Read: To reset the group policy to the default value.

The Administrative Templates worksheet contains three columns that provide more information on the behavior of each policy parameter with respect to restarts, connections, and schema extensions. These columns are as follows:

      1. (Logout required: Yes in this column means that the Windows operating system prompts the user to log out and log back in before applying the policy settings described.
      2. Restart required: Yes in this column means that the Windows operating system must be restarted before applying the policy settings described.
      3. Active Directory scheme or domain requirements: Yes in this column means that you must extend the Active Directory scheme before you can deploy this policy parameter.
      4. Status: New in this column means that the setting did not exist before Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8. This does not mean that the setting applies only to Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8. The supported column tells you to which operating system the policy setting applies.

Download it from Microsoft.

UPDATE: The group policy settings sheet for Windows 10 v1803 can be downloaded here.

You can also view these messages in Full Group Policy Settings for Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer.



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